Skydiving fundraisers took the plunge for Perennial on World Naked Gardening Day

A team of high-flying fundraisers took to the skies on Saturday 2 May skydiving to raise money for Perennial, the charity that is dedicated to helping horticulturists in need. The team of ten brave thrill-seekers leapt out of a plane at 10,000 ft over Norfolk and have so far raised, with Gift Aid, over £4,000 for HortAid 2015, smashing their individual fundraising targets.

To mark World Naked Gardening Day, some of the skydivers wore naked-look flesh coloured morph suits that left little to the imagination. The ‘naked’ skydivers were part of the infamous Grubby Gardeners gang who shot to fame last year when a naked photo shoot for World Naked Gardening Day led to appearances on national media.

From the original Grubby Gardeners line-up, Michael Perry, gardening expert and presenter, David Lewis, Head Gardener at the Kensington Roof Gardens and Andrew Wain, Head Gardener at Euridge Manor near Bath took part in the skydive. They were joined by others including Adele Ford, a double RHS Gold Medal winning garden designer and Perennial’s own Director of Marketing and Development, Anita Bates.

The skydive formed part of Perennial’s annual HortAid fundraising campaign, which raises funds to support to those who work or have worked in horticulture during times of crisis.

You can still donate at:

perennial.org.uk/events/skydive-for-perennial/

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For all media enquiries, interviews, photographs and additional information, please contact:

Clare Johnson | clare@bloom-pr.co.uk | 07815 041635

Jennie Spears | jennie@bloom-pr.co.uk | 07944 552634

Notes for Editors

Perennial offers free, confidential advice and support to everyone working in or retired from horticulture and their families, including gardeners, landscapers, nursery and garden centre staff, parks and grounds care staff and tree surgeons. People turn to Perennial for financial and emotional help in times of need because of disability, sickness, poverty, financial hardship and old age – although increasingly younger people are seeking their assistance. Many individuals describe the services Perennial offers as a ‘lifeline’. The work of Perennial depends entirely on voluntary donations from the horticultural industry and the garden-loving public.

Find out more at www.perennial.org.uk. Follow us on Twitter @PerennialGRBS or find us on Facebook.